Is everyone really welcome?

Has the church failedThis weekend at Westbrook, we spent some time in Acts 8, 10, & 11. These three chapters find Philip and Peter welcoming Gentiles into the family of God. There was some struggle after Peter went to Cornelius, but Gentiles soon became accepted in the Church. Yes, Peter had still had some struggles after Acts 10-11 (see Galatians 2:11-21), but the church as a whole became a welcoming place to Gentiles. Not only were Gentiles welcomed into the church, but it was a place where men, women, young, old, rich, poor, slave, and free all gathered in the first couple of centuries to worship God and participate in the life of the Kingdom.

When I reflect on what the church used to look like and what it predominately looks like now in America, I can’t help but wonder if the church has failed to be like the church in the First Century. In A Fellowship of Differents Scot McKnight writes, “We’ve made the church into the American dream for our own ethnic group with the same set of convictions about next to everything. No one else feels welcome. What Jesus and the apostles taught was that you were welcomed because the church welcomed all to the table.” [1] We’ve let the church become separated. Continue reading

Why #AllLivesMatter isn’t enough for the Church

Photo Credit: Delta57 via Compfight cc
Photo Credit: Delta57 via Compfight cc

Not too long after Michael Brown was shot in Ferguson the #BlackLivesMatter movement started. Since then there’s been a lot of push back from different sides. One of those sides is from people who say we should be saying #AllLivesMatter and not just #BlackLivesMatter. To a certain extent I agree that we should say that all lives matter. It’s Biblical. Christian theology argues that all people are made in the image of God. It doesn’t matter what color your skin is, what language you speak, or what country you were born in, you were made in the image of God. We are all equally made in the image of God and we all matter in God’s eyes. I believe, however, that because of what has happened since Genesis 1 & 2, it’s important to emphasize which lives matter.

Whether we want to recognize it or not, we (meaning Americans) live in a country that has a deeply embedded racist history. The most visible of part of our history is slavery, but there have also been points when our country has been blatantly racist toward Chinese, Japanese, Germans, Mexicans, and others of Hispanic descent. I’m sure that list is hardly exhaustive either. Racism is not just an American problem either. I’m sure you could go to any country and pinpoint a time in history and a people that they have been against simply because of their skin, language, or heritage. Continue reading